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Conversation Piece | Part 2

Jackson, Kilian Rüthemann, Maaike Schoorel, David Schutter

dal 06/02/2016 al 03/04/2016

Curated by Marcello Smarrelli

Fondazione Memmo ­– Arte Contemporanea is proud to present Conversation Piece | Part 2, the second exhibition of a series dedicated to Italian and foreign artists currently living in Rome, either for personal reasons or to attend the cultural and academic institutions. The artists invited to this second exhibition are: Jackson, Kilian Rüthemann, Maaike Schoorel, and David Schutter.

The exhibition, curated by Marcello Smarrelli, was conceived with the aim of continually reviewing the contemporary art scene in Rome. The contemporary art scene is difficult to understand for the general public, but is a surprisingly active panorama dominated by the continuous activity of the Academies and foreign cultural institutes. These institutions have helped to form new generations of artists from all over the world over the last several centuries. Through different exhibitions and activities, Fondazione Memmo aims to support these institutions, which have been considered vital historically in the maintenance and development of the contemporary visual arts and culture in Rome.

The series' title was also influenced by film, inspired by the famous film Gruppo di Famiglia in un interno (Conversation Piece) (1974) by Luchino Visconti. This refers to a genre of painting that was developed in the Netherlands and became popular in England in the XVII and XVIII centuries. These paintings represented a group of people in domestic settings, or engaged in conversation. This exhibition is an opportunity for dialogue on the work of different artists, which is often distanced in research, poetry, and techniques.

This year, the artists have been asked to reflect on the concept of space and how a dialogue can be opened between it and art, to the point that an interpretation of this entered into architecture, which highlights the fragility of the lines between these two disciplines. The artworks are all site-specific, conceived and created for the walls of the Palazzo Ruspoli stables.

The exhibition begins with David Schutter (b. 1974), a fellow at the American Academy, and his personal construction of a mise-en-scène out of 17th century Rome and forced into the present. The artist presents four paintings created from his study of parlor-scale landscapes by Salvator Rosa and Gaspard Dughet in the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica di Palazzo Corsini. Made in his studio without memory aids, Schutter’s artwork is the result of a long visual engagement with paintings as a source of perception. Schutter reproduces the original size and display of the paintings in this exhibition, and his artwork is built into a design on the walls that reflects the space at Palazzo Corsini, where the original Rosa and Dughet paintings are held. This was produced with the collaboration of the Roman architecture firm, stARTT.

The installation of Jackson (b. 1979), a fellow at Academia di Francia a Roma – Villa Medici, takes us into a space in which sound shapes the physical nature of the visible spectrum. Musician, composer, and researcher, Jackson is interested in the hybridisation of different mediums and languages. The artwork, titled Brume Sonore #1, is an evocative sculptural device made of glass, mist, and metal that converts light waves in sound frequencies. Colors radiate on its voyage through the atmosphere and metal vibrations generate a mise en abîme of the perception of matter illustrating what he calls Light Metal Music.

The artwork by Killan Rütherman (b. 1979), a fellow at Instituto Svizzero, establishes a dialogue between a city space and its genius loci, reflecting on an issue that runs through the history of architecture. The installation comprises four walls made of opus latericium, with a particular reference to archetypal space, landscapes, and ancient Roman architecture that introduced the use of bricks, which are still widely used today. Using different languages and materials, the artist reflects on the nature of shapes, the industrial process, and the relationship with the viewer.

The exhibition ends with paintings by Maaike Schoorel (b. 1973), a fellow at the American Academy. Her artwork seems, at first sight, almost monochromatic, but as we get closer we see a landscape, human presence, or fragments of objects. At the entrance of the exhibition, some plants have been installed to create a contrast between the real space and her representation. This makes the lines between reality and fiction fluid, thus extending the exhibition outside towards the city, by which she was inspired.

For the occasion of Conversation Piece | Part 2, Fondazione Memmo – Arte Contemporanea presents a series of free workshops for children aged 3-10 years. This will be held on the 13th of February, the 13th of March, and the 3rd of April. Workshops are only available by appointment. For more information, contact Daphne Ilari at: daphne.ilari@gmail.com.

Presented in collaboration with the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and with:

stARTT-Studio di architettura e trasformazioni territoriali

Industrie Pica

POSCO - ITCP

Thanks to: 

American Academy in Rome

Académie de France à Rome - Villa Medici

Istituto Svizzero

Workshops: 

Oneway Kids